Call For Papers: Special “Global Huck” Forum in Journal of Transnational American Studies

Global Huck: Mapping the Cultural Work of Translations of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Editors: Shelley Fisher Fishkin (Stanford University, USA), Ronald Jenn (Université de Lille, France), Selina Lai-Henderson (Duke Kunshan University, China), Tsuyoshi Ishihara (University of Tokyo, Japan), Holger Kersten (University of Halle-Wittenberg, Germany)

This Special Forum will explore the cultural work done by translations of Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn around the world. It will examine how a range of social, cultural, political, and historical contexts—as well as the agendas of translators and publishers and the expectations of readers—have shaped responses to the novel outside of the US from its publication to the present.  As of 2019, the novel has been translated into at least sixty-three languages, with multiple editions in many languages.

We particularly welcome contributions in the following areas (but are open to many others):

§  How specific translations handle Twain’s social critique

§  What translators’ and editors’ omissions reveal about their social and political anxieties and blind spots

§  How translations intervene in cultural conversations about childhood, education, authority, race, slavery, morality, religion, language politics, dialect, etc., in various countries at various moments in time

§  Comparative discussions of the illustrations

§  How translators deal with offensive racial epithets

§  The influence of translations of Huckleberry Finn on later writers in particular countries

§  How translations shape attitudes about the US around the world

§  How Twain’s humor translates

§  Adaptations and uses of the novel in films, anime, music, advertising, popular culture, etc.

Essays may be comparative in nature, or may focus on a particular translation. We also welcome theoretical translation studies essays on transnational issues rooted in translations of Huckleberry Finn; and short essays by translators on the challenges of translating particular passages (such as Pap’s “Call this a govment” rant in Chapter 6 and Huck’s battle with his conscience ending with “All right then, I’ll go to hell!” in Chapter 31).

While we are open to studies of the racial politics of the novel in a broad range of global contexts, we particularly welcome investigations of this topic in

·      the Afrikaans translation by famous anti-apartheid writer André Brink (Capetown. 1963)

·       the Portuguese translation by celebrated São Tomé-born Afro-Portuguese poet José Tenreiro (Lisbon,1973

We also welcome examinations of the cultural politics of neglected translations including

·      the Yiddish translation published in Kiev in 1929

·      Vietnamese versions published in Hanoi and Saigon in the 1960s

·      translations in languages of the former Soviet Union (Armenian, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Tatar, and Turkmen) and languages of the Baltic countries (Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian)

·      translations into languages of the India sub-continent (Assamese, Bengali, Gujarat, Hindi, and Telugu)

Note: Editors may be able to help with locating particular translations. Just write to us to enquire. [[email protected]<mailto:[email protected]>]

Proposals of up to 400 words should be sent to [email protected]<mailto:[email protected]> along with a short bio of the author. We welcome traditional articles of 4,000 to 6,000 words or micro-essays of 1,200 words.

Proposals are due by January 1st, 2020

Notification of acceptance by February 1st, 2020

Final essays due June 15th, 2020

Publication will be contingent on acceptance by peer-reviewers and the JTAS editorial board. Essays should be in English. They may include direct quotations in other languages alongside English translations of those quotations.

The first book-length study of Mark Twain published anywhere came out in Paris in 1884, penned by French critic Henry Gauthier-Villard. Scholars who have examined Mark Twain’s international appeal include Archibald Henderson (1911), Roger Asselineau (1954), Howard Baetzhold (1970), Robert M. Rodney (1982), Carl Dolmetsch (1993), Holger Kersten (1993, 1999, 2005), Shelley Fisher Fishkin (1997, 2010, 2011, 2015, 2019), Raphaele Berthele (2000), Judith Lavoie (2002), Tsuyoshi Ishihara (2005), Ronald Jenn (2006), Selina Lai-Henderson (2015), and Paula Harrington and Ronald Jenn (2017).

Asselineau, Roger. The Literary Reputation of Mark Twain from 1910 to 1950: A Critical Essay and Bibliography. Paris: Librairie Marcel Didier, 1954.

Berthele, Raphaele. “Translating African-American Vernacular English into German: The Problem of ‘Jim’ in Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn.” Journal of Sociolinguistics 4, no. 4 (2000): 588–613.

Baetzhold, Howard G. Mark Twain and John Bull: The British Connection. Bloomington: University of Indiana University Press, 1970.

Dolmetsch, Carl. “Our Famous Guest”: Mark Twain in Vienna. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1993.

Fishkin, Shelley Fisher. “American Literature in Transnational Perspective: The Case of Mark Twain.”  Blackwell Companion to American Literary Studies.” Edited by Caroline  F. Levander and Robert S. Levine. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.

———. “DEEP MAPS: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest Mapping Projects (DPMPs) or ‘Deep Maps.’” Journal of Transnational American Studies. 3:2.

Winter 2011. http://escholarship.org/uc/item/92v100t0<https://escholarship.org/uc/item/92v100t0>

———. Lighting Out for the Territory: Reflections on Mark Twain and American Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

———. “‘Originally of Missouri, Now of the Universe’: Mark Twain and the World.”  In Nadja Gernalzick and Heike C. Spickermann, eds. Developing Transnational American Studies. Heidelberg: Winter, 2019.

———. “Transnational Twain.” In American Studies as Transnational Practice, edited by

Donald Pease and Yuan Shu.  University Press of New England, 2015.

Fishkin, Shelley Fisher, editor. The Mark Twain Anthology: Great Writers on his Life and Works. New York: Library of America, 2010.

Gauthier-Villars, Henry. Mark Twain. Paris: Gauthier-Villars, 1884.

Henderson, Archibald. Mark Twain. New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1911.

Ishihara, Tsuyoshi. Mark Twain in Japan: The Cultural Reception of an American Icon. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2005.

Jenn, Ronald. “From American Frontier to European Borders: Publishing French Translations of Mark Twain’s Novels Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn (1884–1963).” Book History 9 (2006): 235–60.

Jenn, Ronald, and Paula Harrington. Mark Twain and France: The Making of a New American Identity. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2017.

Kersten, Holger. “Mark Twain and Continental Europe.” In A Companion to Mark Twain, edited by Peter Messent and Louis J. Budd. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005.

———. “‘Human Natur in a Forren Aspeck’: Mark Twain’s Encounters with German Culture.” Mark Twain Review (The Mark Twain Circle of Korea) 4 (1999): 47–72.

———. Von Hannibal nach Heidelberg: Mark Twain und die Deutschen. [From Hannibal to Heidelberg: Mark Twain and the Germans]. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 1993.

Lai-Henderson, Selina. Mark Twain in China. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2015.

Lavoie, Judith. Mark Twain et la parole noir. Montréal: Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal, 2001.

Rodney, Robert M., editor and compiler. Mark Twain International: A Bibliography and Interpretation of his Worldwide Popularity. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1982.

CFP: C19 Biennial Conference at Coral Gables, FL (April 2-5, 2020)

2020 Theme: Dissent

CLICK HERE for 2020 Conference “Dissent” Website

C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists seeks submissions for its sixth biennial conference, which will take place April 2-5, 2020 in Coral Gables, Florida, with the generous support of the University of Miami and Florida International University. We invite individual paper, panel, and roundtable proposals on literature and culture in and beyond the United States during the long nineteenth century.

The long nineteenth century was a time of political, social, and cultural volatility, marked by conflict, strife, discord, protest, and disagreement. It was an age of rebellion, riot, and revolution; it was an era in which social movements, such as women’s rights, labor rights, abolitionism, civil rights, Indigenous rights, land rights, anti-imperialism, and religious dissidence coincided with ideological revolt/s, such as communism, communitism, socialism, and spiritualism. It was an epoch of bodily dissent that incited and galvanized resistance to enforced and coerced gender, racial, class, and sexual norms. It was also a time in which literary and cultural formations expressly challenged artistic orthodoxy in favor of experiments in both content and form.

With this theme, we aim to inspire a broad consideration of varied forms of “dissent”: nonconformity to existing identities, institutions, policies, practices, and norms in the long nineteenth century. What constitutes “dissent” in this period? How do we think through genealogies of dissent–that is, the ways nineteenth-century dissent might or might not offer a way to frame contemporary circumstances and formations?

We also hope to engender discussions about dissent in scholarship and pedagogy. How might we challenge dominant or conventional theoretical and methodological approaches within nineteenth-century American literary and cultural studies? Do we need reformulations of what constitutes analysis, proper objects of study, disciplinary boundaries, and field formation? How might the particular historical and archival labor of nineteenth century American studies challenge the scholarly values of the twenty-first century university?

Lastly, how might we theorize divergences from dissent, such as accord, consensus, convention, and acceptance, or reactionary forms of dissent, such as nativism and revanchism? To what extent might dissent itself, so often framed as a form of negation, risk closing off intellectual and political possibilities in our work and in our classrooms? Are there limits to “critique”? In what ways might we productively dissent from dissent?

In addition to submissions related to our theme, we invite papers and panels on other topics, especially those engaging literary, cultural and historical perspectives on nineteenth century Florida and its location within the circum-Caribbean. We particularly encourage transhemispheric, transoceanic, and transnational approaches; presentations attending to migration, movement, and travel, and those examining the complex lives, afterlives and ecologies of settler colonialism, indigeneity, slavery and empire.

Format

C19 welcomes proposals for roundtables, workshops, dialogues, and innovative presentation formats, as well as traditional panels and individual paper submissions. We prefer that proposals with multiple participants reflect a diversity of institutional affiliation, academic rank, and disciplinary background. Please include at least four presenters on a panel, one of whom might be a respondent. All group proposals must leave time for discussion (each session is 90 minutes long). Individuals seeking potential collaborators may wish to use the C19 listserv, the discussion board on C19’s Facebook page, or Twitter, using the #C19Amlit hashtag or by tagging @C19Americanists.

C19: 2020 will once again feature a series of seminars which will provide participants the opportunity for a collaborative conversation around a particular topic. Each seminar will be capped at 15 participants and will be run by leaders with expertise in the topic. Typically, each participant will submit a five-page paper before the conference to be read in advance by the other participants; time in the seminar itself will be reserved for discussion. Seminar participants will be listed in the program. Participation as both a presenter and seminar participant will be allowed only as space permits. Leaders are chosen by the Program Committee. Topics and seminar leaders will be announced soon.

Conference participants are limited to one appearance on the program in a substantive role (presenter, roundtable participant, or respondent), and one appearance as a session organizer, chair, seminar participant, or speaker/facilitator on a professional support session. Please submit only one proposal for a substantive role.

Submissions will be due September 2, 2019. Detailed submission information on conference website will be available shortly.

CFP: Mark Twain Circle at SAMLA in Atlanta, GA (November 8-10, 2019)

South Atlantic Modern Language Association — NOVEMBER 8th – 10th, 2019
Atlanta, Georgia
Call for Papers

Power: Elements, Aspects, and Instances in Mark Twain Studies

The Mark Twain Circle invites papers for a panel at the SAMLA 2019 convention that analyze elements, aspects, and instances of power in Mark Twain’s works, including but not limited to his fiction, essays, or autobiography. This panel seeks papers that explore how power is presented in Twain’s works, who holds power, how it is maintained, how power is reinforced, challenged, subverted, or undermined. Other areas of interest include how power is determined or denied based on wealth, occupation, political advantages or disadvantages, gender, race, social status, or other factors, and how characters who lack power navigate within, around, or under powerful characters or institutions. Additional inquires might explore questions regarding the extent to which power contributes to a sense of personal, regional, or national identity, or whether language functions as an indication of power or powerlessness? Other inquiries regarding power are welcome as well.

Send 150-250 word abstracts (electronic submissions are welcome) by May 1st, 2019 to: 
Gretchen Martin
The University of Virginia’s College at Wise
1 College Avenue
Wise, VA 24293 [email protected]

CFP: Nineteenth Century American Forum of the MLA in Seattle, WA (January 9-12, 2020)

The Nineteenth Century American Forum is planning to sponsor three panels at MLA 2020 in Seattle. Please consider submitting an abstract for one of the CFPs listed below.

New Approaches to Reading (in) Nineteenth-Century America


How might scholars formulate new approaches to reading (in) the nineteenth century—especially in ways attuned to race, gender, sexuality, class, and disability. Send 250-word abstract and biography to [email protected] and [email protected]. Deadline for submissions: Friday, March 15, 2019

C19 Comparative Race and Indigeneity


Comparative and/or relational frameworks for analyzing race and indigeneity in connection with the 19th-century U.S. Send 250-word abstract and brief bio to [email protected] by March 15. Deadline for submissions: Friday, March 15, 2019

Confederate Monuments, Memory, and Memorials: The Uses and Abuses of the Nineteenth Century(co-sponsored with LLC Southern United States)

In light of the terrorist events that took place in Charlottesville, VA on August 11-12, 2017, medievalists and classicists were very publicly forced to address the white supremacist (mis)uses of their historical eras. Historians of the US Civil War and the US Civil Rights Movement also weighed in on everything from Lost Cause paraphernalia to the removal of Confederate monuments around the country.  Literary specialists, however, have not as readily been called upon to enter the conversation.  Given that the popular resurgence of confederate idealization and romanticization deeply involves nineteenth-century US literary cultures, this panel seeks expert commentary on this topic from those who specialize in the postbellum period, and especially those who study African American literatures and/or literatures of the southern United States. Panelists might comment upon the relationship between literary representations of the US Civil
War and the installation of confederate monuments, the relationship between Reconstruction and Confederate memory, and/or how to responsibly teach the Confederacy in US literature courses. Please send 250—word abstract and brief bio to Marlene Daut ([email protected]) and Jarvis McInnis ([email protected]). Deadline for submissions: Friday, March 15, 2019

CFP: Mark Twain Circle at MLA in Seattle, WA (January 9-12, 2020)

“Mark Twain and Globalism”

Illustration from The Innocents Abroad; or, The New Pilgrim’s Progress,
American Publishing Company, 1869.

Although Mark Twain is often characterized as a quintessentially American writer, he is almost as frequently noted as a citizen of the world. The Mark Twain Circle seeks proposals for papers that investigate Twain’s writings in a transnational context, interpreting representations of the American and the other in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, international politics, and cultural contact.

MLA requires that presenters be members of MLA at the time of the panel’s submission to the program. We also encourage panelists to become members of the Mark Twain Circle. We are especially eager to receive submissions from emerging scholars and members of underrepresented groups. 

Send proposals to Larry Howe, President of the Mark Twain Circle:  [email protected]
Deadline:  March 15, 2019

 

The Clemens Conference in Hannibal, Missouri (July 25-27, 2019)

THE CLEMENS CONFERENCE July 25-27, 2019
HANNIBAL, MISSOURI

Click here for the 2019 Clemens Conference Schedule

Click here to register for the 2019 Clemens Conference

Who: Mark Twain fans, friends, and scholars gathering to celebrate Mark Twain’s legacy and to share experiences.

What: Jam-packed three days including 30 Mark Twain paper presentations, special speakers, field trips to the Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum, Jim’s Journey Museum, a riverboat ride on the Mississippi River, cave exploration, and a trip to Florida, Missouri for the Mark Twain Birthplace and the John Quarles farm site. The full schedule will be available soon on our web site.

Where: Hannibal, Missouri, Mark Twain’s Boyhood Home. The conference is centered on the campus of Hannibal-LaGrange University, a four-year Christian university affiliated with the Missouri Baptist Convention (Southern Baptist). Hannibal-LaGrange University is a smoke and alcohol-free campus.

Where to stay: Hannibal-LaGrange University has air-conditioned dormitory rooms available at $20/$30 per night. Contact [email protected]. Hannibal has a variety of motels and bed & breakfast options. A listing is available at www.visithannibal.com.

When: Attend an opening reception in the Mark Twain Museum Gallery Thursday evening, July 24. The conference begins Thursday morning, July 25 and runs through the evening riverboat dinner cruise Saturday night, July 27.

Why: To bring together kindred minds to share scholarship and tall tales related to Mark Twain and to advance Mark Twain scholarship through the papers being presented.

How Much? The full registration is $325. This includes –

            Wednesday evening reception at the Mark Twain Museum Gallery

            Choice of 30 research presentations

            Special speakers and keynote address

            All field trips

            Three meals Thursday, Friday and Saturday and breakfast Sunday

If you cannot attend the full conference, contact Henry Sweets with your anticipated attendance and pro-rated fees will be available.

How to Get to Hannibal: Driving is an option and directions for orienting one to Hannibal are available. The closest large airport is St. Louis, Missouri, about two hours driving time from Hannibal. Car rentals are available as well as shuttles (that can be expensive). An alternative is Sky West (United Express) with flights from Chicago O’Hare Airport to Quincy, Illinois. We will arrange to pick up conference attendees at the Quincy airport at no charge.

More Information or Questions – contact

            Henry Sweets, Executive Director

            Mark Twain Museum

            120 North Main Street

            Hannibal  MO  63401 U.S.A.

            573-221-9010

            [email protected]