Black Lives Matter at Quarry Farm

In “A True Story,” written at Quarry Farm in 1874, Mark Twain frankly acknowledges his ignorance of black experience. Larry Howe discusses how Twain uses the story to check his own privilege and amplify the voice of a black woman, Mary Ann Cord.

Dispatches From Quarry Farm: Distance Lends Enchantment To The View

Caretaker Steve Webb and his son are the only year-round residents of Quarry Farm. Steve provides us with occasional, not always altogether reliable, updates from the premises. The grey-green Daffodil shoots still break the surface of the cold brown earth.  The birds still sing. A dog still begs and plays and snores, waiting for the next chance.  A caretaker is, by nature, a social distancer  “Distance lends enchantment to the […]

Silent Work in Elmira: Letters from the Wilbur H. Siebert Underground Railroad Collection

In our effort to preserve the history of the Underground Railroad in Elmira, and Mark Twain’s familial connection to that history, we are grateful to the Ohio History Connection for allowing us to reproduced relevant letters written by Susan Crane and John W. Jones.

“The Gospel of Revolt: Mark Twain in Elmira,” An Episode of The C19: America In The Nineteenth-Century Podcast, Featuring Hal Holbrook

A podcast tour of Elmira, listeners are introduced to the legacies of the Park Church, Woodlawn Cemetery, and Quarry Farm, as well as a cast of characters from the Underground Railroad, Women’s Rights Movement, and, of course, Mark Twain’s in-laws.